International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

François Gérard

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2022
TCHES
High-order Table-based Conversion Algorithms and Masking Lattice-based Encryption
Masking is the main countermeasure against side-channel attacks on embedded devices. For cryptographic algorithms that combine Boolean and arithmetic masking, one must therefore convert between the two types of masking, without leaking additional information to the attacker. In this paper we describe a new high-order conversion algorithm between Boolean and arithmetic masking, based on table recomputation, and provably secure in the ISW probing model. We show that our technique is particularly efficient for masking structured LWE encryption schemes such as Kyber and Saber. In particular, for Kyber IND-CPA decryption, we obtain an order of magnitude improvement compared to existing techniques.
2022
EUROCRYPT
Mitaka: A Simpler, Parallelizable, Maskable Variant of Falcon 📺
This work describes the Mitaka signature scheme: a new hash-and-sign signature scheme over NTRU lattices which can be seen as a variant of NIST finalist Falcon. It achieves comparable efficiency but is considerably simpler, online/offline, and easier to parallelize and protect against side-channels, thus offering significant advantages from an implementation standpoint. It is also much more versatile in terms of parameter selection. We obtain this signature scheme by replacing the FFO lattice Gaussian sampler in Falcon by the “hybrid” sampler of Ducas and Prest, for which we carry out a detailed and corrected security analysis. In principle, such a change can result in a substantial security loss, but we show that this loss can be largely mitigated using new techniques in key generation that allow us to construct much higher quality lattice trapdoors for the hybrid sampler relatively cheaply. This new approach can also be instantiated on a wide variety of base fields, in contrast with Falcon's restriction to power-of-two cyclotomics. We also introduce a new lattice Gaussian sampler with the same quality and efficiency, but which is moreover compatible with the integral matrix Gram root technique of Ducas et al., allowing us to avoid floating point arithmetic. This makes it possible to realize the same signature scheme as Mitaka efficiently on platforms with poor support for floating point numbers. Finally, we describe a provably secure masking of Mitaka. More precisely, we introduce novel gadgets that allow provable masking at any order at much lower cost than previous masking techniques for Gaussian sampling-based signature schemes, for cheap and dependable side-channel protection.
2022
TCHES
High-order Table-based Conversion Algorithms and Masking Lattice-based Encryption
Masking is the main countermeasure against side-channel attacks on embedded devices. For cryptographic algorithms that combine Boolean and arithmetic masking, one must therefore convert between the two types of masking, without leaking additional information to the attacker. In this paper we describe a new high-order conversion algorithm between Boolean and arithmetic masking, based on table recomputation, and provably secure in the ISW probing model. We show that our technique is particularly efficient for masking structured LWE encryption schemes such as Kyber and Saber. In particular, for Kyber IND-CPA decryption, we obtain an order of magnitude improvement compared to existing techniques.
2020
TCHES
Cortex-M4 optimizations for {R,M} LWE schemes 📺
This paper proposes various optimizations for lattice-based key encapsulation mechanisms (KEM) using the Number Theoretic Transform (NTT) on the popular ARM Cortex-M4 microcontroller. Improvements come in the form of a faster code using more efficient modular reductions, optimized small-degree polynomial multiplications, and more aggressive layer merging in the NTT, but also in the form of reduced stack usage. We test our optimizations in software implementations of Kyber and NewHope, both round 2 candidates in the NIST post-quantum project, and also NewHope-Compact, a recently proposed variant of NewHope with smaller parameters. Our software is the first implementation of NewHope-Compact on the Cortex-M4 and shows speed improvements over previous high-speed implementations of Kyber and NewHope. Moreover, it gives a common framework to compare those schemes with the same level of optimization. Our results show that NewHope- Compact is the fastest scheme, followed by Kyber, and finally NewHope, which seems to suffer from its large modulus and error distribution for small dimensions.