International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Dan Boneh

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
CRYPTO
Halo Infinite: Proof-Carrying Data from Additive Polynomial Commitments 📺
Polynomial commitment schemes (PCS) have recently been in the spotlight for their key role in building SNARKs. A PCS provides the ability to commit to a polynomial over a finite field and prove its evaluation at points. A *succinct* PCS has commitment size and evaluation proof size sublinear in the degree of the polynomial. An *efficient* PCS has sublinear proof verification. Any efficient and succinct PCS can be used to construct a SNARK with similar security and efficiency characteristics (in the random oracle model). Proof-carrying data (PCD) enables a set of parties to carry out an indefinitely long distributed computation where every step along the way is accompanied by a proof of correctness. It generalizes *incrementally verifiable computation* and can even be used to construct SNARKs. Until recently, however, the only known method for constructing PCD required expensive SNARK recursion. A system called *Halo* first demonstrated a new methodology for building PCD without SNARKs, exploiting an aggregation property of the *Bulletproofs* inner-product argument. The construction was *heuristic* because it makes non-black-box use of a concrete instantiation of the Fiat-Shamir transform. We expand upon this methodology to show that PCD can be (heuristically) built from any homomorphic polynomial commitment scheme (PCS), even if the PCS evaluation proofs are neither succinct nor efficient. In fact, the Halo methodology extends to any PCS that has an even more general property, namely the ability to aggregate linear combinations of commitments into a new succinct commitment that can later be opened to this linear combination. Our results thus imply new constructions of SNARKs and PCD that were not previously described in the literature and serve as a blueprint for future constructions as well.
2020
ASIACRYPT
Improving Speed and Security in Updatable Encryption Schemes 📺
Periodic key rotation is a common practice designed to limit the long-term power of cryptographic keys. Key rotation refers to the process of re-encrypting encrypted content under a fresh key, and overwriting the old ciphertext with the new one. When encrypted data is stored in the cloud, key rotation can be very costly: it may require downloading the entire encrypted content from the cloud, re-encrypting it on the client's machine, and uploading the new ciphertext back to the cloud. An updatable encryption scheme is a symmetric-key encryption scheme designed to support efficient key rotation in the cloud. The data owner sends a short update token to the cloud. This update token lets the cloud rotate the ciphertext from the old key to the new key, without learning any information about the plaintext. Recent work on updatable encryption has led to several security definitions and proposed constructions. However, existing constructions are not yet efficient enough for practical adoption, and the existing security definitions can be strengthened. In this work we make three contributions. First, we introduce stronger security definitions for updatable encryption (in the ciphertext-dependent setting) that capture desirable security properties not covered in prior work. Second, we construct two new updatable encryption schemes. The first construction relies only on symmetric cryptographic primitives, but only supports a bounded number of key rotations. The second construction supports a (nearly) unbounded number of updates, and is built from the Ring Learning with Errors (RLWE) assumption. Due to complexities of using RLWE, this scheme achieves a slightly weaker notion of integrity compared to the first. Finally, we implement both constructions and compare their performance to prior work. Our RLWE-based construction is 200x faster than a prior proposal for an updatable encryption scheme based on the hardness of elliptic curve DDH. Our first construction, based entirely on symmetric primitives, has the highest encryption throughput, approaching the performance of AES, and the highest decryption throughput on ciphertexts that were re-encrypted fewer than fifty times. For ciphertexts re-encrypted over fifty times, the RLWE construction dominates it in decryption speed.
2020
ASIACRYPT
Oblivious Pseudorandom Functions from Isogenies 📺
An oblivious PRF, or OPRF, is a protocol between a client and a server, where the server has a key $k$ for a secure pseudorandom function $F$, and the client has an input $x$ for the function. At the end of the protocol the client learns $F(k,x)$, and nothing else, and the server learns nothing. An OPRF is verifiable if the client is convinced that the server has evaluated the PRF correctly with respect to a prior commitment to $k$. OPRFs and verifiable OPRFs have numerous applications, such as private-set-intersection protocols, password-based key-exchange protocols, and defense against denial-of-service attacks. Existing OPRF constructions use RSA-, Diffie-Hellman-, and lattice-type assumptions. The first two are not post-quantum secure. In this paper we construct OPRFs and verifiable OPRFs from isogenies. Our main construction uses isogenies of supersingular elliptic curves over $\Fpp$ and tries to adapt the Diffie-Hellman OPRF to that setting. However, a recent attack on supersingular-isogeny systems due to Galbraith~et~al.~[ASIACRYPT 2016] makes this approach difficult to secure. To overcome this attack, and to validate the server's response, we develop two new zero-knowledge protocols that convince each party that its peer has sent valid messages. With these protocols in place, we obtain an OPRF in the SIDH setting and prove its security in the UC framework. Our second construction is an adaptation of the Naor-Reingold PRF to commutative group actions. Combining it with recent constructions of oblivious transfer from isogenies, we obtain an OPRF in the CSIDH setting.
2019
TCHES
Fast and simple constant-time hashing to the BLS12-381 elliptic curve 📺
Riad S. Wahby Dan Boneh
Pairing-friendly elliptic curves in the Barreto-Lynn-Scott family are seeing a resurgence in popularity because of the recent result of Kim and Barbulescu that improves attacks against other pairing-friendly curve families. One particular Barreto-Lynn-Scott curve, called BLS12-381, is the locus of significant development and deployment effort, especially in blockchain applications. This effort has sparked interest in using the BLS12-381 curve for BLS signatures, which requires hashing to one of the groups of the bilinear pairing defined by BLS12-381.While there is a substantial body of literature on the problem of hashing to elliptic curves, much of this work does not apply to Barreto-Lynn-Scott curves. Moreover, the work that does apply has the unfortunate property that fast implementations are complex, while simple implementations are slow.In this work, we address these issues. First, we show a straightforward way of adapting the “simplified SWU” map of Brier et al. to BLS12-381. Second, we describe optimizations to this map that both simplify its implementation and improve its performance; these optimizations may be of interest in other contexts. Third, we implement and evaluate. We find that our work yields constant-time hash functions that are simple to implement, yet perform within 9% of the fastest, non–constant-time alternatives, which require much more complex implementations.
2019
CRYPTO
Batching Techniques for Accumulators with Applications to IOPs and Stateless Blockchains 📺
We present batching techniques for cryptographic accumulators and vector commitments in groups of unknown order. Our techniques are tailored for distributed settings where no trusted accumulator manager exists and updates to the accumulator are processed in batches. We develop techniques for non-interactively aggregating membership proofs that can be verified with a constant number of group operations. We also provide a constant sized batch non-membership proof for a large number of elements. These proofs can be used to build the first positional vector commitment (VC) with constant sized openings and constant sized public parameters. As a core building block for our batching techniques we develop several succinct proof systems in groups of unknown order. These extend a recent construction of a succinct proof of correct exponentiation, and include a succinct proof of knowledge of an integer discrete logarithm between two group elements. We circumvent an impossibility result for Sigma-protocols in these groups by using a short trapdoor-free CRS. We use these new accumulator and vector commitment constructions to design a stateless blockchain, where nodes only need a constant amount of storage in order to participate in consensus. Further, we show how to use these techniques to reduce the size of IOP instantiations, such as STARKs. The full version of the paper is available online [BBF18b].
2019
CRYPTO
Zero-Knowledge Proofs on Secret-Shared Data via Fully Linear PCPs 📺
We introduce and study the notion of fully linear probabilistically checkable proof systems. In such a proof system, the verifier can make a small number of linear queries that apply jointly to the input and a proof vector.Our new type of proof system is motivated by applications in which the input statement is not fully available to any single verifier, but can still be efficiently accessed via linear queries. This situation arises in scenarios where the input is partitioned or secret-shared between two or more parties, or alternatively is encoded using an additively homomorphic encryption or commitment scheme. This setting appears in the context of secure messaging platforms, verifiable outsourced computation, PIR writing, private computation of aggregate statistics, and secure multiparty computation (MPC). In all these applications, there is a need for fully linear proof systems with short proofs.While several efficient constructions of fully linear proof systems are implicit in the interactive proofs literature, many questions about their complexity are open. We present several new constructions of fully linear zero-knowledge proof systems with sublinear proof size for “simple” or “structured” languages. For example, in the non-interactive setting of fully linear PCPs, we show how to prove that an input vector $$x\in {\mathbb {F}}^n$$, for a finite field $${\mathbb {F}}$$, satisfies a single degree-2 equation with a proof of size $$O(\sqrt{n})$$ and $$O(\sqrt{n})$$ linear queries, which we show to be optimal. More generally, for languages that can be recognized by systems of constant-degree equations, we can reduce the proof size to $$O(\log n)$$ at the cost of $$O(\log n)$$ rounds of interaction.We use our new proof systems to construct new short zero-knowledge proofs on distributed and secret-shared data. These proofs can be used to improve the performance of the example systems mentioned above.Finally, we observe that zero-knowledge proofs on distributed data provide a general-purpose tool for protecting MPC protocols against malicious parties. Applying our short fully linear PCPs to “natural” MPC protocols in the honest-majority setting, we can achieve unconditional protection against malicious parties with sublinear additive communication cost. We use this to improve the communication complexity of recent honest-majority MPC protocols. For instance, using any pseudorandom generator, we obtain a 3-party protocol for Boolean circuits in which the amortized communication cost is only one bit per AND gate per party (compared to 10 bits in the best previous protocol), matching the best known protocols for semi-honest parties.
2018
EUROCRYPT
2018
CRYPTO
Verifiable Delay Functions 📺
We study the problem of building a verifiable delay function (VDF). A $$\text {VDF}$$VDFrequires a specified number of sequential steps to evaluate, yet produces a unique output that can be efficiently and publicly verified. $$\text {VDF}$$VDFs have many applications in decentralized systems, including public randomness beacons, leader election in consensus protocols, and proofs of replication. We formalize the requirements for $$\text {VDF}$$VDFs and present new candidate constructions that are the first to achieve an exponential gap between evaluation and verification time.
2018
CRYPTO
Threshold Cryptosystems from Threshold Fully Homomorphic Encryption 📺
We develop a general approach to adding a threshold functionality to a large class of (non-threshold) cryptographic schemes. A threshold functionality enables a secret key to be split into a number of shares, so that only a threshold of parties can use the key, without reconstructing the key. We begin by constructing a threshold fully-homomorphic encryption scheme (ThFHE) from the learning with errors (LWE) problem. We next introduce a new concept, called a universal thresholdizer, from which many threshold systems are possible. We show how to construct a universal thresholdizer from our ThFHE. A universal thresholdizer can be used to add threshold functionality to many systems, such as CCA-secure public-key encryption (PKE), signature schemes, pseudorandom functions, and others primitives. In particular, by applying this paradigm to a (non-threshold) lattice signature system, we obtain the first single-round threshold signature scheme from LWE.
2018
TCC
Exploring Crypto Dark Matter:
Pseudorandom functions (PRFs) are one of the fundamental building blocks in cryptography. Traditionally, there have been two main approaches for PRF design: the “practitioner’s approach” of building concretely-efficient constructions based on known heuristics and prior experience, and the “theoretician’s approach” of proposing constructions and reducing their security to a previously-studied hardness assumption. While both approaches have their merits, the resulting PRF candidates vary greatly in terms of concrete efficiency and design complexity.In this work, we depart from these traditional approaches by exploring a new space of plausible PRF candidates. Our guiding principle is to maximize simplicity while optimizing complexity measures that are relevant to cryptographic applications. Our primary focus is on weak PRFs computable by very simple circuits—specifically, depth-2$$\mathsf {ACC}^0$$ circuits. Concretely, our main weak PRF candidate is a “piecewise-linear” function that first applies a secret mod-2 linear mapping to the input, and then a public mod-3 linear mapping to the result. We also put forward a similar depth-3 strong PRF candidate.The advantage of our approach is twofold. On the theoretical side, the simplicity of our candidates enables us to draw many natural connections between their hardness and questions in complexity theory or learning theory (e.g., learnability of $$\mathsf {ACC}^0$$ and width-3 branching programs, interpolation and property testing for sparse polynomials, and new natural proof barriers for showing super-linear circuit lower bounds). On the applied side, the piecewise-linear structure of our candidates lends itself nicely to applications in secure multiparty computation (MPC). Using our PRF candidates, we construct protocols for distributed PRF evaluation that achieve better round complexity and/or communication complexity (often both) compared to protocols obtained by combining standard MPC protocols with PRFs like AES, LowMC, or Rasta (the latter two are specialized MPC-friendly PRFs).Finally, we introduce a new primitive we call an encoded-input PRF, which can be viewed as an interpolation between weak PRFs and standard (strong) PRFs. As we demonstrate, an encoded-input PRF can often be used as a drop-in replacement for a strong PRF, combining the efficiency benefits of weak PRFs and the security benefits of strong PRFs. We conclude by showing that our main weak PRF candidate can plausibly be boosted to an encoded-input PRF by leveraging standard error-correcting codes.
2018
ASIACRYPT
Compact Multi-signatures for Smaller Blockchains
We construct new multi-signature schemes that provide new functionality. Our schemes are designed to reduce the size of the Bitcoin blockchain, but are useful in many other settings where multi-signatures are needed. All our constructions support both signature compression and public-key aggregation. Hence, to verify that a number of parties signed a common message m, the verifier only needs a short multi-signature, a short aggregation of their public keys, and the message m. We give new constructions that are derived from Schnorr signatures and from BLS signatures. Our constructions are in the plain public key model, meaning that users do not need to prove knowledge or possession of their secret key.In addition, we construct the first short accountable-subgroup multi-signature (ASM) scheme. An ASM scheme enables any subset $$ S $$ of a set of n parties to sign a message m so that a valid signature discloses which subset generated the signature (hence the subset $$ S $$ is accountable for signing m). We construct the first ASM scheme where signature size is only $$O(\kappa )$$ bits over the description of $$ S $$, where $$\kappa $$ is the security parameter. Similarly, the aggregate public key is only $$O(\kappa )$$ bits, independent of n. The signing process is non-interactive. Our ASM scheme is very practical and well suited for compressing the data needed to spend funds from a t-of-n Multisig Bitcoin address, for any (polynomial size) t and n.
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
EUROCRYPT
2017
PKC
2017
TCC
2016
ASIACRYPT
2015
JOFC
2015
EUROCRYPT
2015
EUROCRYPT
2014
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
EUROCRYPT
2014
ASIACRYPT
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
ASIACRYPT
2013
EUROCRYPT
2012
TCC
2012
ASIACRYPT
2011
PKC
2011
TCC
2011
EUROCRYPT
2011
ASIACRYPT
2011
JOFC
2010
PKC
2010
CRYPTO
2010
EUROCRYPT
2009
PKC
2008
JOFC
2008
ASIACRYPT
2008
CRYPTO
2007
CRYPTO
2007
TCC
2007
TCC
2006
CRYPTO
2006
EUROCRYPT
2006
PKC
2005
CRYPTO
2005
EUROCRYPT
2005
TCC
2005
CRYPTO
2004
CRYPTO
2004
CRYPTO
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
EUROCRYPT
2004
JOFC
2003
EUROCRYPT
2002
ASIACRYPT
2001
ASIACRYPT
2001
ASIACRYPT
2001
CRYPTO
2001
CRYPTO
2001
CRYPTO
2001
EUROCRYPT
2001
JOFC
2000
ASIACRYPT
2000
CRYPTO
1999
CRYPTO
1999
CRYPTO
1999
EUROCRYPT
1998
ASIACRYPT
1998
EUROCRYPT
1997
CRYPTO
1997
EUROCRYPT
1996
CRYPTO
1996
CRYPTO
1995
CRYPTO
1995
CRYPTO

Program Committees

Crypto 2017
Crypto 2012
Crypto 2011
Eurocrypt 2010
Crypto 2009
Crypto 2003 (Program chair)
Eurocrypt 2002
Eurocrypt 2000
Asiacrypt 2000
Crypto 2000
Eurocrypt 1999
Crypto 1998

Coauthors

Martín Abadi (1)
Shweta Agrawal (3)
Jae Hyun Ahn (2)
Joseph Bonneau (1)
Xavier Boyen (11)
Elette Boyle (1)
Benedikt Bünz (2)
Jan Camenisch (2)
Henry Corrigan-Gibbs (3)
Giovanni Di Crescenzo (1)
Özgür Dagdelen (1)
Richard A. DeMillo (2)
Justin Drake (1)
Manu Drijvers (1)
Glenn Durfee (4)
Saba Eskandarian (1)
Ben Fisch (3)
Marc Fischlin (1)
Yair Frankel (1)
Matthew K. Franklin (4)
David Freeman (4)
Ariel Gabizon (1)
Rosario Gennaro (1)
Craig Gentry (3)
Niv Gilboa (1)
Eu-Jin Goh (2)
Steven Goldfeder (1)
Philippe Golle (1)
Sergey Gorbunov (1)
Divya Gupta (1)
Shai Halevi (3)
Mike Hamburg (2)
Susan Hohenberger (2)
Nick Howgrave-Graham (2)
William E. Skeith III (1)
Yuval Ishai (4)
Aayush Jain (1)
Markus Jakobsson (1)
Antoine Joux (1)
Ari Juels (1)
Jonathan Katz (1)
Sam Kim (4)
Dmitry Kogan (1)
Eyal Kushilevitz (1)
Anja Lehmann (1)
Kevin Lewi (3)
Richard J. Lipton (4)
Ben Lynn (3)
Ilya Mironov (2)
Hart William Montgomery (2)
Moni Naor (1)
Gregory Neven (1)
Phong Q. Nguyen (1)
Valeria Nikolaenko (1)
Kobbi Nissim (1)
Rafail Ostrovsky (3)
Alain Passelègue (1)
Giuseppe Persiano (1)
Ananth Raghunathan (4)
Peter M. R. Rasmussen (1)
Mariana Raykova (1)
Amit Sahai (8)
Christian Schaffner (1)
Stuart E. Schechter (1)
Gil Segev (4)
Hovav Shacham (4)
James Shaw (1)
Abhi Shelat (2)
Emily Shen (1)
Maurice Shih (1)
Igor E. Shparlinski (1)
Vinod Vaikuntanathan (1)
Ramarathnam Venkatesan (2)
Dhinakaran Vinayagamurthy (1)
Riad S. Wahby (1)
Brent Waters (10)
Katharine Woo (1)
David J. Wu (5)
Mark Zhandry (6)
Sheng Zhong (1)
Joe Zimmerman (1)