International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Chris Peikert

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2021
TCC
Vector and Functional Commitments from Lattices 📺
Chris Peikert Zachary Pepin Chad Sharp
Vector commitment (VC) schemes allow one to commit concisely to an ordered sequence of values, so that the values at desired positions can later be proved concisely. In addition, a VC can be statelessly updatable, meaning that commitments and proofs can be updated to reflect changes to individual entries, using knowledge of just those changes (and not the entire vector). VCs have found important applications in verifiable outsourced databases, cryptographic accumulators, and cryptocurrencies. However, to date there have been relatively few post-quantum constructions, i.e., ones that are plausibly secure against quantum attacks. More generally, functional commitment (FC) schemes allow one to concisely and verifiably reveal various functions of committed data, such as linear functions (i.e., inner products, including evaluations of a committed polynomial). Under falsifiable assumptions, all known functional commitments schemes have been limited to ``linearizable'' functions, and there are no known post-quantum FC schemes beyond ordinary VCs. In this work we give post-quantum constructions of vector and functional commitments based on the standard Short Integer Solution lattice problem (appropriately parameterized): \begin{itemize} \item First, we present new statelessly updatable VCs with significantly shorter proofs than (and efficiency otherwise similar to) the only prior post-quantum, statelessly updatable construction (Papamanthou \etal, EUROCRYPT 13). Our constructions use private-key setup, in which an authority generates public parameters and then goes offline. \item Second, we construct functional commitments for \emph{arbitrary (bounded) Boolean circuits} and branching programs. Under falsifiable assumptions, this is the first post-quantum FC scheme beyond ordinary VCs, and the first FC scheme of any kind that goes beyond linearizable functions. Our construction works in a new model involving an authority that generates the public parameters and remains online to provide public, reusable ``opening keys'' for desired functions of committed messages. \end{itemize}
2020
EUROCRYPT
He Gives C-Sieves on the CSIDH 📺
Chris Peikert
Recently, Castryck, Lange, Martindale, Panny, and Renes proposed \emph{CSIDH} (pronounced ``sea-side'') as a candidate post-quantum ``commutative group action.'' It has attracted much attention and interest, in part because it enables noninteractive Diffie--Hellman-like key exchange with quite small communication. Subsequently, CSIDH has also been used as a foundation for digital signatures. In 2003--04, Kuperberg and then Regev gave asymptotically subexponential quantum algorithms for ``hidden shift'' problems, which can be used to recover the CSIDH secret key from a public key. In late 2011, Kuperberg gave a follow-up quantum algorithm called the \emph{collimation sieve} (``c-sieve'' for short), which improves the prior ones, in particular by using exponentially less quantum memory and offering more parameter tradeoffs. While recent works have analyzed the concrete cost of the original algorithms (and variants) against CSIDH, nothing of this nature was previously available for the c-sieve. This work fills that gap. Specifically, we generalize Kuperberg's collimation sieve to work for arbitrary finite cyclic groups, provide some practical efficiency improvements, give a classical (i.e., non-quantum) simulator, run experiments for a wide range of parameters up to the actual CSIDH-512 group order, and concretely quantify the complexity of the c-sieve against CSIDH. Our main conclusion is that the proposed CSIDH parameters provide relatively little quantum security beyond what is given by the cost of quantumly evaluating the CSIDH group action itself (on a uniform superposition). For example, the cost of CSIDH-512 key recovery is only about~$2^{16}$ quantum evaluations using~$2^{40}$ bits of quantumly accessible \emph{classical} memory (plus relatively small other resources). This improves upon a prior estimate of~$2^{32.5}$ evaluations and~$2^{31}$ qubits of \emph{quantum} memory, for a variant of Kuperberg's original sieve. Under the plausible assumption that quantum evaluation does not cost much more than what is given by a recent ``best case'' analysis, CSIDH-512 can therefore be broken using significantly less than~$2^{64}$ quantum T-gates. This strongly invalidates its claimed NIST level~1 quantum security, especially when accounting for the MAXDEPTH restriction. Moreover, under analogous assumptions for CSIDH-1024 and -1792, which target higher NIST security levels, except near the high end of the MAXDEPTH range even these instantiations fall short of level~1.
2020
PKC
Constraining and Watermarking PRFs from Milder Assumptions 📺
Chris Peikert Sina Shiehian
Constrained pseudorandom functions (C-PRFs) let the possessor of a secret key delegate the ability to evaluate the function on certain authorized inputs, while keeping the remaining function values pseudorandom. A constraint-hiding constrained PRF (CHC-PRF) additionally conceals the predicate that determines which inputs are authorized. These primitives have a wealth of applications, including watermarking schemes, symmetric deniable encryption, and updatable garbled circuits. Recent works have constructed (CH)C-PRFs from rather aggressive parameterizations of Learning With Errors (LWE) with subexponential modulus-noise ratios, even for relatively simple “puncturing” or $$ ext {NC}^{1}$$ circuit constraints. This corresponds to strong lattice assumptions and inefficient constructions, and stands in contrast to LWE-based unconstrained PRFs and fully homomorphic encryption schemes, which can be based on quasi-polynomial or even (nearly) polynomial modulus-noise ratios. In this work we considerably improve the LWE assumptions needed for building (constraint-hiding) constrained PRFs and watermarking schemes. In particular, for CHC-PRFs and related watermarking schemes we improve the modulus-noise ratio to $$lambda ^{O((d+log lambda ) log lambda )}$$ for depth- d circuit constraints, which is merely quasi-polynomial for $$ ext {NC}^{1}$$ circuits and closely related watermarking schemes. For (constraint-revealing) C-PRFs for $$ ext {NC}^{1}$$ we do even better, obtaining a nearly polynomial $$lambda ^{omega (1)}$$ ratio. These improvements are partly enabled by slightly modifying the definition of C-PRFs, in a way that is still compatible with many of their applications. Finally, as a contribution of independent interest we build CHC-PRFs for special constraint classes from generic , weaker assumptions: we obtain bit-fixing constraints based on the minimal assumption of one-way functions, and hyperplane-membership constraints based on key-homomorphic PRFs.
2020
PKC
Improved Discrete Gaussian and Subgaussian Analysis for Lattice Cryptography 📺
Discrete Gaussian distributions over lattices are central to lattice-based cryptography, and to the computational and mathematical aspects of lattices more broadly. The literature contains a wealth of useful theorems about the behavior of discrete Gaussians under convolutions and related operations. Yet despite their structural similarities, most of these theorems are formally incomparable, and their proofs tend to be monolithic and written nearly “from scratch,” making them unnecessarily hard to verify, understand, and extend. In this work we present a modular framework for analyzing linear operations on discrete Gaussian distributions. The framework abstracts away the particulars of Gaussians, and usually reduces proofs to the choice of appropriate linear transformations and elementary linear algebra. To showcase the approach, we establish several general properties of discrete Gaussians, and show how to obtain all prior convolution theorems (along with some new ones) as straightforward corollaries. As another application, we describe a self-reduction for Learning With Errors (LWE) that uses a fixed number of samples to generate an unlimited number of additional ones (having somewhat larger error). The distinguishing features of our reduction are its simple analysis in our framework, and its exclusive use of discrete Gaussians without any loss in parameters relative to a prior mixed discrete-and-continuous approach. As a contribution of independent interest, for subgaussian random matrices we prove a singular value concentration bound with explicitly stated constants, and we give tighter heuristics for specific distributions that are commonly used for generating lattice trapdoors. These bounds yield improvements in the concrete bit-security estimates for trapdoor lattice cryptosystems.
2019
CRYPTO
Noninteractive Zero Knowledge for NP from (Plain) Learning with Errors 📺
Chris Peikert Sina Shiehian
We finally close the long-standing problem of constructing a noninteractive zero-knowledge (NIZK) proof system for any NP language with security based on the plain Learning With Errors (LWE) problem, and thereby on worst-case lattice problems. Our proof system instantiates the framework recently developed by Canetti et al.  [EUROCRYPT’18], Holmgren and Lombardi [FOCS’18], and Canetti et al.  [STOC’19] for soundly applying the Fiat–Shamir transform using a hash function family that is correlation intractable for a suitable class of relations. Previously, such hash families were based either on “exotic” assumptions (e.g., indistinguishability obfuscation or optimal hardness of certain LWE variants) or, more recently, on the existence of circularly secure fully homomorphic encryption (FHE). However, none of these assumptions are known to be implied by plain LWE or worst-case hardness.Our main technical contribution is a hash family that is correlation intractable for arbitrary size-S circuits, for any polynomially bounded S, based on plain LWE (with small polynomial approximation factors). The construction combines two novel ingredients: a correlation-intractable hash family for log-depth circuits based on LWE (or even the potentially harder Short Integer Solution problem), and a “bootstrapping” transform that uses (leveled) FHE to promote correlation intractability for the FHE decryption circuit to arbitrary (bounded) circuits. Our construction can be instantiated in two possible “modes,” yielding a NIZK that is either computationally sound and statistically zero knowledge in the common random string model, or vice-versa in the common reference string model.
2019
TCC
Algebraically Structured LWE, Revisited
Chris Peikert Zachary Pepin
In recent years, there has been a proliferation of algebraically structured Learning With Errors (LWE) variants, including Ring-LWE, Module-LWE, Polynomial-LWE, Order-LWE, and Middle-Product LWE, and a web of reductions to support their hardness, both among these problems themselves and from related worst-case problems on structured lattices. However, these reductions are often difficult to interpret and use, due to the complexity of their parameters and analysis, and most especially their (frequently large) blowup and distortion of the error distributions.In this paper we unify and simplify this line of work. First, we give a general framework that encompasses all proposed LWE variants (over commutative base rings), and in particular unifies all prior “algebraic” LWE variants defined over number fields. We then use this framework to give much simpler, more general, and tighter reductions from Ring-LWE to other algebraic LWE variants, including Module-LWE, Order-LWE, and Middle-Product LWE. In particular, all of our reductions have easy-to-analyze and frequently small error expansion; in some cases they even leave the error unchanged. A main message of our work is that it is straightforward to use the hardness of the original Ring-LWE problem as a foundation for the hardness of all other algebraic LWE problems defined over number fields, via simple and rather tight reductions.
2018
PKC
New (and Old) Proof Systems for Lattice Problems
We continue the study of statistical zero-knowledge (SZK) proofs, both interactive and noninteractive, for computational problems on point lattices. We are particularly interested in the problem $$\textsf {GapSPP}$$GapSPP of approximating the $$\varepsilon $$ε-smoothing parameter (for some $$\varepsilon < 1/2$$ε<1/2) of an n-dimensional lattice. The smoothing parameter is a key quantity in the study of lattices, and $$\textsf {GapSPP}$$GapSPP has been emerging as a core problem in lattice-based cryptography, e.g., in worst-case to average-case reductions. We show that $$\textsf {GapSPP}$$GapSPP admits SZK proofs for remarkably low approximation factors, improving on prior work by up to roughly $$\sqrt{n}$$n. Specifically:There is a noninteractive SZK proof for $$O(\log (n) \sqrt{\log (1/\varepsilon )})$$O(log(n)log(1/ε))-approximate $$\textsf {GapSPP}$$GapSPP. Moreover, for any negligible $$\varepsilon $$ε and a larger approximation factor $$\widetilde{O}(\sqrt{n \log (1/\varepsilon )})$$O~(nlog(1/ε)), there is such a proof with an efficient prover.There is an (interactive) SZK proof with an efficient prover for $$O(\log n + \sqrt{\log (1/\varepsilon )/\log n})$$O(logn+log(1/ε)/logn)-approximate coGapSPP. We show this by proving that $$O(\log n)$$O(logn)-approximate $$\textsf {GapSPP}$$GapSPP is in $$\mathsf {coNP} $$coNP. In addition, we give an (interactive) SZK proof with an efficient prover for approximating the lattice covering radius to within an $$O(\sqrt{n})$$O(n) factor, improving upon the prior best factor of $$\omega (\sqrt{n \log n})$$ω(nlogn).
2018
PKC
Privately Constraining and Programming PRFs, the LWE Way
Chris Peikert Sina Shiehian
Constrained pseudorandom functions allow for delegating “constrained” secret keys that let one compute the function at certain authorized inputs—as specified by a constraining predicate—while keeping the function value at unauthorized inputs pseudorandom. In the constraint-hiding variant, the constrained key hides the predicate. On top of this, programmable variants allow the delegator to explicitly set the output values yielded by the delegated key for a particular set of unauthorized inputs.Recent years have seen rapid progress on applications and constructions of these objects for progressively richer constraint classes, resulting most recently in constraint-hiding constrained PRFs for arbitrary polynomial-time constraints from Learning With Errors (LWE) [Brakerski, Tsabary, Vaikuntanathan, and Wee, TCC’17], and privately programmable PRFs from indistinguishability obfuscation (iO) [Boneh, Lewi, and Wu, PKC’17].In this work we give a unified approach for constructing both of the above kinds of PRFs from LWE with subexponential $$\exp (n^{\varepsilon })$$exp(nε) approximation factors. Our constructions follow straightforwardly from a new notion we call a shift-hiding shiftable function, which allows for deriving a key for the sum of the original function and any desired hidden shift function. In particular, we obtain the first privately programmable PRFs from non-iO assumptions.
2017
TCC
2016
EUROCRYPT
2016
CRYPTO
2016
TCC
2015
JOFC
2015
TCC
2014
CRYPTO
2014
CRYPTO
2014
FSE
2013
CRYPTO
2013
CRYPTO
2013
EUROCRYPT
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
EUROCRYPT
2012
PKC
2012
JOFC
Bonsai Trees, or How to Delegate a Lattice Basis
We introduce a new lattice-based cryptographic structure called a bonsai tree, and use it to resolve some important open problems in the area. Applications of bonsai trees include an efficient, stateless ‘hash-and-sign’ signature scheme in the standard model (i.e., no random oracles), and the first hierarchical identity-based encryption (HIBE) scheme (also in the standard model) that does not rely on bilinear pairings. Interestingly, the abstract properties of bonsai trees seem to have no known realization in conventional number-theoretic cryptography.
2011
CRYPTO
2010
TCC
2010
CRYPTO
2010
EUROCRYPT
2010
EUROCRYPT
2009
TCC
2009
CRYPTO
2008
FSE
2008
CRYPTO
2008
CRYPTO
2006
TCC
2006
TCC
2005
TCC
2001
ASIACRYPT

Program Committees

Crypto 2021 (Program chair)
Crypto 2021
Crypto 2020
Crypto 2019
TCC 2018
TCC 2017
Eurocrypt 2017
TCC 2015
PKC 2015
TCC 2014
Crypto 2014
PKC 2013
Crypto 2012
TCC 2011
Asiacrypt 2011
Eurocrypt 2011
Crypto 2009
TCC 2008