International Association for Cryptologic Research

International Association
for Cryptologic Research

CryptoDB

Johann Großschädl

Publications

Year
Venue
Title
2022
TCHES
Highly Vectorized SIKE for AVX-512
It is generally accepted that a large-scale quantum computer would be capable to break any public-key cryptosystem used today, thereby posing a serious threat to the security of the Internet’s public-key infrastructure. The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) addresses this threat with an open process for the standardization of quantum-safe key establishment and signature schemes, which is now in the final phase of the evaluation of candidates. SIKE (an abbreviation of Supersingular Isogeny Key Encapsulation) is one of the alternate candidates under evaluation and distinguishes itself from other candidates due to relatively short key lengths and relatively high computing costs. In this paper, we analyze how the latest generation of Intel’s Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX), in particular AVX-512IFMA, can be used to minimize the latency (resp. maximize the throughput) of the SIKE key encapsulation mechanism when executed on Ice Lake CPUs based on the Sunny Cove microarchitecture. We present various techniques to parallelize and speed up the base/extension field arithmetic, point arithmetic, and isogeny computations performed by SIKE. All these parallel processing techniques are combined in AVXSIKE, a highly optimized implementation of SIKE using Intel AVX-512IFMA instructions. Our experiments indicate that AVXSIKE instantiated with the SIKEp503 parameter set is approximately 1.5 times faster than the to-date best AVX-512IFMA-based SIKE software from the literature. When executed on an Intel Core i3-1005G1 CPU, AVXSIKE outperforms the x64 assembly implementation of SIKE contained in Microsoft’s SIDHv3.4 library by a factor of about 2.5 for key generation and decapsulation, while the encapsulation is even 3.2 times faster.
2022
TCHES
Highly Vectorized SIKE for AVX-512
It is generally accepted that a large-scale quantum computer would be capable to break any public-key cryptosystem used today, thereby posing a serious threat to the security of the Internet’s public-key infrastructure. The US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) addresses this threat with an open process for the standardization of quantum-safe key establishment and signature schemes, which is now in the final phase of the evaluation of candidates. SIKE (an abbreviation of Supersingular Isogeny Key Encapsulation) is one of the alternate candidates under evaluation and distinguishes itself from other candidates due to relatively short key lengths and relatively high computing costs. In this paper, we analyze how the latest generation of Intel’s Advanced Vector Extensions (AVX), in particular AVX-512IFMA, can be used to minimize the latency (resp. maximize the hroughput) of the SIKE key encapsulation mechanism when executed on Ice Lake CPUs based on the Sunny Cove microarchitecture. We present various techniques to parallelize and speed up the base/extension field arithmetic, point arithmetic, and isogeny computations performed by SIKE. All these parallel processing techniques are combined in AvxSike, a highly optimized implementation of SIKE using Intel AVX-512IFMA instructions. Our experiments indicate that AvxSike instantiated with the SIKEp503 parameter set is approximately 1.5 times faster than the to-date best AVX-512IFMA-based SIKE software from the literature. When executed on an Intel Core i3-1005G1 CPU, AvxSike outperforms the x64 assembly implementation of SIKE contained in Microsoft’s SIDHv3.4 library by a factor of about 2.5 for key generation and decapsulation, while the encapsulation is even 3.2 times faster.
2021
TCHES
An Instruction Set Extension to Support Software-Based Masking 📺
In both hardware and software, masking can represent an effective means of hardening an implementation against side-channel attack vectors such as Differential Power Analysis (DPA). Focusing on software, however, the use of masking can present various challenges: specifically, it often 1) requires significant effort to translate any theoretical security properties into practice, and, even then, 2) imposes a significant overhead in terms of efficiency. To address both challenges, this paper explores the use of an Instruction Set Extension (ISE) to support masking in software-based implementations of a range of (symmetric) cryptographic kernels including AES: we design, implement, and evaluate such an ISE, using RISC-V as the base ISA. Our ISE-supported first-order masked implementation of AES, for example, is an order of magnitude more efficient than a software-only alternative with respect to both execution latency and memory footprint; this renders it comparable to an unmasked implementation using the same metrics, but also first-order secure.
2021
TCHES
Batching CSIDH Group Actions using AVX-512 📺
Commutative Supersingular Isogeny Diffie-Hellman (or CSIDH for short) is a recently-proposed post-quantum key establishment scheme that belongs to the family of isogeny-based cryptosystems. The CSIDH protocol is based on the action of an ideal class group on a set of supersingular elliptic curves and comes with some very attractive features, e.g. the ability to serve as a “drop-in” replacement for the standard elliptic curve Diffie-Hellman protocol. Unfortunately, the execution time of CSIDH is prohibitively high for many real-world applications, mainly due to the enormous computational cost of the underlying group action. Consequently, there is a strong demand for optimizations that increase the efficiency of the class group action evaluation, which is not only important for CSIDH, but also for related cryptosystems like the signature schemes CSI-FiSh and SeaSign. In this paper, we explore how the AVX-512 vector extensions (incl. AVX-512F and AVX-512IFMA) can be utilized to optimize constant-time evaluation of the CSIDH-512 class group action with the goal of, respectively, maximizing throughput and minimizing latency. We introduce different approaches for batching group actions and computing them in SIMD fashion on modern Intel processors. In particular, we present a hybrid batching technique that, when combined with optimized (8 × 1)-way prime-field arithmetic, increases the throughput by a factor of 3.64 compared to a state-of-the-art (non-vectorized) x64 implementation. On the other hand, vectorization in a 2-way fashion aimed to reduce latency makes our AVX-512 implementation of the group action evaluation about 1.54 times faster than the state-of-the-art. To the best of our knowledge, this paper is the first to demonstrate the high potential of using vector instructions to increase the throughput (resp. decrease the latency) of constant-time CSIDH.
2020
TOSC
Lightweight AEAD and Hashing using the Sparkle Permutation Family 📺
We introduce the Sparkle family of permutations operating on 256, 384 and 512 bits. These are combined with the Beetle mode to construct a family of authenticated ciphers, Schwaemm, with security levels ranging from 120 to 250 bits. We also use them to build new sponge-based hash functions, Esch256 and Esch384. Our permutations are among those with the lowest footprint in software, without sacrificing throughput. These properties are allowed by our use of an ARX component (the Alzette S-box) as well as a carefully chosen number of rounds. The corresponding analysis is enabled by the long trail strategy which gives us the tools we need to efficiently bound the probability of all the differential and linear trails for an arbitrary number of rounds. We also present a new application of this approach where the only trails considered are those mapping the rate to the outer part of the internal state, such trails being the only relevant trails for instance in a differential collision attack. To further decrease the number of rounds without compromising security, we modify the message injection in the classical sponge construction to break the alignment between the rate and our S-box layer.
2020
CRYPTO
Alzette: a 64-bit ARX-box (feat. CRAX and TRAX) 📺
S-boxes are the only source of non-linearity in many symmetric cryptographic primitives. While they are often defined as being functions operating on a small space, some recent designs propose the use of much larger ones (e.g., 32 bits). In this context, an S-box is then defined as a subfunction whose cryptographic properties can be estimated precisely. In this paper, we present a 64-bit ARX-based S-box called Alzette which can be evaluated in constant time using only 12 instructions on modern CPUs. Its parallel application can also leverage vector (SIMD) instructions. One iteration of Alzette has differential and linear properties comparable to those of the AES S-box, while two iterations are at least as secure as the AES super S-box. Since the state size is much larger than the typical 4 or 8 bits, the study of the relevant cryptographic properties of Alzette is not trivial. We further discuss how such wide S-boxes could be used to construct round functions of 64-, 128- and 256-bit (tweakable) block ciphers with good cryptographic properties that are guaranteed even in the related-tweak setting. We use these structures to design a very lightweight 64-bit block cipher (CRAX) which outerperforms SPECK-64/128 for short messages on micro-controllers, and a 256-bit tweakable block cipher (TRAX) which can be used to obtain strong security guarantees against powerful adversaries (nonce misuse, quantum attacks).
2016
ASIACRYPT
2015
FSE
2015
CHES
2014
CHES
2011
CHES
2008
CHES
2007
CHES
2006
CHES
2006
CHES
2005
CHES
2004
CHES
2001
CHES
2000
CHES

Program Committees

CHES 2013
CHES 2010